Oversized art in Kids’ rooms

Oversized art & Kids

James went on a business trip once and the person kindly offered to put him up for the night. I remember getting this distress call from him, late into the night, followed by a picture to share his nightmare. The pic showed a bed covered in approximately 10 000 soft toys, in all shapes and sizes, ready for him to dive in. Needless to say, you can’t really be at your best talking business the following day, knowing your host knows you shared the bed with a giant Hello Kitty. Business did not happen as planned, as you might have guessed – I think that saucy Hello Kitty was to blame. But I guess there is a lesson in this for all – like we should not speak to kids in silly baby language, so we should not ‘baby up’ any room to much. 

The purpose of art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls.

                                                                                                                   Pablo Picasso

 

I can honestly say that I’ve got a real love/hate relationship with creating nurseries/kids spaces. First off, it can veer to the kitsch side oh-so-very-quickly. Don’t get me started on those Disney-themed rooms – which include the matchy matchy duvet and wall decals for good measure. In my mind, that is considered the ultimate nightmare and sure to cause a child not to sleep.

My approach is quite pragmatic. Your little cherub is not going to be a tiny infant forever, which means that those ghastly Disney decals will most likely overstay their welcome. Rather pick a few key baby pieces (read for small) which affirms that the occupant of the room is indeed a baby/child, but could easily be removed should the room need to do double duty as a guest room for a night or two.

Which brings me to the point of this post. Lets not go crazy with the wall murals, please…. We don’t have to plaster the walls in a scene out of Narnia, just a beautiful copy of the book is enough to show you are educated and well-read. This is my solution. Why not opt for a piece of really big grown-up art? Something that could grow with them – much nicer and way edgier! I’m busy trying to pull my 6 year old’s room together and am planning on going this route. Something impressive will take the edge of the blush walls, I’ve decided. 

Now if your heart is screaming yes! to big art, but your wallet is screaming No!, then I’ve also got some solutions for you. My go-to source for pic art is normally AllPosters – I’ve -used them for many installations. Affordable, great quality and an insane selection.  But what I love about it the most, the sizing options. If you’re looking for something a bit more exclusive, then Anewall is another site I would recommend. Beautiful, but just a little out of my budget for the moment. Minted also stocks some great fine art options for kids rooms.

What you think of these over-sized beauties? I think Liz Taylor below, might just get dad to get in on the pajama drill!

Over sized art & Kids

Oversized art & kids

Oversized art & Kids

Oversized art & Kids

Oversized art & Kids

Oversized art & Kids

Over sized art & Kids

Over sized art & Kids

Oversized art & Kids

Oversized art & Kids

Pic Credits: 1| 2| 3| 4| 5| 6| 7| 8| 9| 10| 11|

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Plate Parade

Plate Parade

Have you ever broken a plate? On purpose? I have……. and it felt good! I’m not Greek, although, a small part of me wish I was. I had a flatmate at Varsity who is Greek, and I used to live for sunday evenings – she used to rock-up at the flat with left-over Moussaka, and some insanely sweet  Batklava – which we would use to eat in one sitting with 3 spoons – Gaedry, Michelle & myself. Heaven.  Who on earth could say no to Souvlaki, Moussaka, a good generous chunk of feta with a glass of wine or a mean salad, peppered with olives, sun-ripened tomatoes and a kick-ass dressing….. a simple one – preferred. Definitely not me. I simply love food to much. 

 

Fame is a fickle food upon a shifting plate.

                                                                      Emily Dickinson

But… so is the presentation thereof……. don’t give me food slapped on a plate with no love. I can sense it. And I don’t like it. It is right up there with you handing me a gift that was not wrapped – for God’s sake, take the time to wrap it – even if it’s a box of chocolates, it will escalate in value ten fold, just because of its presentation……..

So, in short, please take the time to set the table (even if done in a simple way) and for God’s sake, please set a plate. I’m not one to straddle my food on a stick, wine glass in hand and trying to sound intelligent (I talk with my hands). 

It seems that evolution has clearly left its mark – plates are required to at least look civilised, not even bordering  posh…….. unlike the Greeks, who smashed them once they where done, we tend to seek out really nice looking ones – even wash them and keep them – to admire behind glass-fronted cabinets.  According to Wikipedia,  the custom probably derives from an ancient practice of ritually “killing” plates on mourning occasions, as a means of dealing with loss. Breaking plates may also be related to the ancient practise of conspicuous consumption, a display of one’s wealth, as plates or glasses are thrown into a fireplace following a banquet instead of being washed and reused. I think I might just get use to that. I should have married a Greek I guess, but I settled for a Scot, so washing plates are in my near & far future. 

It is thought that the earliest plates used by people would have been large leaves, gourd halves, or perhaps sea shells which would be used as simple bowls for holding food. Food items would be placed upon the large leaves or on other containers in the centre of the eating area then eaten communally by all members of a tribe, family, or group.

People discovered early on though the uses of clay and made for themselves simple bowls, cups, jugs, and storage jars. Examples of the pottery dinnerware made by these early people can be seen in museums around the world.

The idea of individuals having their own plate to eat from is a fairly new idea. Originally in Europe food would have been brought to the table on platters and carved. People would then use their fingers to take what they wanted from the platters to eat. Breads and fruit would be placed in baskets on the floor for diners to help themselves.

In order to help you with some side plate issues, I’ve rounded-up the nicest looking ones – perfect to place next to your standard white crockery. What you think? No need breaking these beauties. I’ll hang onto my Scot.

 

 

Plate Parade

 

 

Plate Parade

Plate Parade

Plate Parade

 

Plate Parade

Plate Parade

Plate Parade

Plate Parade MP_009 MP_006  

Plate Parade

Plate Parade

Plate Parade

Plate Parade

Plate Parade

Plate Parade

Plate Parade

http://www.ruanhoffmann.com/old-work/

Plate Parade

Plate Parade

Plate Parade

Pic Source: 1| 2| 3| 4| 5| 6| 7| 8| 9| 10| 11| 12| 13| 14| 15| 16| 17| 18| 19| 20| 21| 22| 23|24|

 

 

 

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